July 23, 2019

Addressing Common Mistakes with Two-Component Low-Rise Adhesives

Two-component low-rise urethane adhesives have become increasingly popular since their introduction into the single-ply roofing industry over 30 years ago. Since 2015, the two-component low-rise urethane adhesive market has significantly expanded due to the introduction of new low-pressure dispensing equipment. While low-rise urethane adhesives provide several advantages when designing a roof to withstand extreme weather events, there are common mistakes that can affect the application of the product. Below are common mistakes that can occur during two-component urethane adhesive applications: Gaps between the deck and wall/penetration that are not sealed: Unsealed gaps allow humid air to enter the roofing assembly and condensate on the deck, weakening the insulation facer. A physical air block using foam or a backer rod in addition to VapAir 725TR or Pressure-Sensitive Flashing is required. Loose material or moisture on the deck: Dirt, dust, debris, and loose felts will compromise the adhesive bond. After brooming, use a blower to remove any residual contamination. Deck must be dry. Un-weathered asphalt wasn’t primed: Carlisle requires the use of CAV-GRIP™ III or 702 Primer over weathered asphalt when beads are spaced at 4”, 6", or 12" o.c.. Adhesion to un-weathered asphalt is doubled with CAV-GRIP III or 702 Primer, with CAV-GRIP III being the preferred method. Fastening the first layer of insulation is an option. Depressions in the deck not accounted for: Hard insulation boards will bridge depressions or deflections in the deck. These areas should be marked ahead of time so that more adhesive or thicker adhesive can be applied to compensate. Pencil thin beads applied: Proper application and performance requires a minimum ½"-wide wet bead of adhesive that will foam out to around 1-1.5". Bead spacing exceeds specification: Bead spacing has a direct impact on the uplift performance of the assembly. If the spec calls for 6" o.c. and it is applied it at 8" or 9" o.c., the ultimate uplift strength will be reduced. A 4" o.c. spacing requires 12 beads per 4' x 4' board. A 6" o.c. spacing requires 8 beads per 4' x 4' board. A 12" o.c. spacing requires 4 beads per 4' x 4' board (Maximum 4' x 4' insulation boards when adhesive is extruded at 12" o.c. or when boards exceed 4" thickness, or 4' x 8' insulation boards when adhesive is applied in full spray, 4", or 6" beads.). 12" bead spacing used in corners and perimeters: Corners and perimeters experience more wind uplift pressure, which is why Carlisle requires tighter bead spacing in these areas. 12" bead spacing is not acceptable in corners or perimeters. Know the spacing requirements prior to starting the job. Thin application over gravel BUR: A thicker application of adhesive is required over a properly prepared gravel BUR. The foam must rise 3/8" above the remaining gravel, or it won’t touch the board. Not waiting for “string/gel” time: If insulation boards are set prior to the adhesive reaching string- or gel-like consistency, the foam cells collapse back to a liquid and the adhesive loses a significant amount of its holding power. This is very important to note. No weighted roller used, and no relief cuts or constant weight applied: Rigid insulation boards must be forced into the adhesive with a 150-lb. segmented weighted roller. Relief cuts and constant weight are sometimes required to promote a solid bond. Rolling the boards at the 5-minute mark allows adhesive to gain strength. Changing static mixing tips: When the Part-A side and Part-B side of 2-component urethane adhesives are mixed together, it creates a thermal reaction that produces the adhesive. The adhesive in small static mixing tips will begin to solidify after 15-20 seconds, meaning the tips must be changed to avoid off-ratio or clogged guns. Not shaking Dual Tanks: Dual Tanks use a propellant to disperse the adhesive. To activate the propellant, the tanks must be shaken for 30-seconds prior to using. When the tanks are not agitated, the adhesive will not disperse properly, reducing coverage rates or producing off ratio adhesive. Cold or Hot Adhesive: Keeping adhesive at the recommended temperatures is important to ensure proper performance. Adhesives that are too cold or too hot will affect coverage rates and the performance of the adhesive. During winter applications, hot boxes and heated blankets should be used to keep the material between 70-90°F. For more information about two-component low-rise adhesives, please contact Austin Kulp.     Austin Kulp     Fleece Membranes & Coatings Product Manager     Product Marketing     [email protected]

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July 9, 2019

CAV-GRIP III Dos and Don'ts

CAV-GRIP™ III Low-VOC Adhesive is an optimal choice when you’re installing fully adhered EPDM or TPO roofing systems. This low-odor adhesive requires minimal setup time, dries fast, and can be applied quickly and accurately. Plus, its long “open time” makes it a prime candidate for projects utilizing larger sheets. Like anything else, there are dos and don’ts associated with using CAV-GRIP III. Check out these guidelines to ensure a proper, headache-free installation. DO Keep replacement tips handy – CAV-GRIP III spray guns have brass tips which achieve the optimal spray pattern. However, a clogged or damaged tip can negatively affect spray capabilities and result in wasted adhesive. To ensure that a damaged tip won’t delay your progress, it’s a good idea keep a bag of replacement tips handy. Use a splitter – Consider using a splitter if you’re working with the larger 85 lb. cylinders. Splitters allow you to attach two hoses to one tank, which can double productivity. Store properly – Store CAV-GRIP III cylinders in a protected, conditioned space with temperatures above 70°F prior to and during application. If CAV-GRIP is stored below the 70-degree mark, you’ll have to wait for it to warm up before application. If a cylinder is below the minimum temperature, it will produce an intermittent spray or “sputter” when it is used. TIP: try warming the product up before checking to see if your gun or hose are clogged. Secure all cylinders – Make sure you properly secure cylinders (regardless of whether they’re full, partially full, or empty) so they can’t roll off the roof. Use the right gun for the situation – The CAV-GRIP III Spray Gun with Extension Wand is perfect for wide-open roof areas, while the regular CAV-GRIP III Spray Gun (without the extension wand) is ideal for tight or confined areas. Keep the gun moving – Keep the spray gun moving while you’re spraying the adhesive to avoid thick or puddled areas. Adjust your technique if necessary – While you’re spraying, you may need to adjust the distance between the gun and the substrate to attain the proper coverage rate. In windy conditions, control the amount of trigger pull to ensure a proper web pattern is achieved and to prevent adhesive from being blown away. Clean up – You can reuse your guns and hoses over and over again if you keep them clean. First, completely depressurize the cylinder. Disconnect the gun and hose assembly and immediately attach it to a canister of Low-VOC UN-TACK™. Pull the trigger and allow the UN-TACK to flow through the hose and gun for five to ten seconds, or until the liquid coming out is clear. Depressurize the UN-TACK, remove the assembly, and store for future use. DON'T Don’t wipe adhesive off the spray tip – Immediately after spraying CAV-GRIP III, you may see adhesive buildup on the tip of the spray gun. The installer’s first reaction is often to wipe away this residue with a rag; however, doing this forces cured adhesive back into the tip orifice, leading to improper spray patterns and ultimately a clogged gun. Instead, allow the adhesive to thicken on the tip and peel away the buildup when you’re ready to spray again. Don’t shake – Unlike Carlisle’s Flexible FAST™ Dual Tank Adhesive, you do not need to shake the CAV-GRIP III cylinder prior to application. Shaking the cylinder will disrupt the adhesive and result in the loss of propellant, which is vital to achieving the expected 1,000 ft2 coverage rate per cylinder in a two-sided application. Don’t tilt – Don’t tilt the cylinder or lay it on its side while applying adhesive. Doing so will result in air pockets within the gun and hose assembly which could affect the spray pattern and reduce your coverage rate. Don’t mishandle – CAV-GRIP cylinders are pressured tanks and must be handled with care. Treat cylinders more like a propane torch set and less like a pail of standard bonding adhesive, both on and off the jobsite. Don’t overspray – Don’t apply adhesive to splices to be hot-air welded or areas where primer and pressure-sensitive tape will be applied. If overspray occurs, use Weathered Membrane Cleaner or commercial-grade duct tape to remove it. Don’t install membrane too soon – Don’t install membrane over wet or puddled CAV-GRIP III. Doing so will trap solvents between the membrane and substrate, causing “solvent bubbles”. Allow the adhesive about three to five minutes to set up, or become tacky, before installing membrane. Don’t use band heaters in cold weather – Band heaters can reach temperatures of more than 400° F, which can cause over-pressurization inside the cylinder and lead to a valve failure and loss of product. Instead, try power-heated blankets and/or hot boxes when necessary. Don’t let a disconnected hose sit around – Adhesive can cure inside the hose or gun, causing it to sputter or become blocked. When switching a hose and gun assembly from one cylinder to another, make sure both cylinders are sitting side-by-side during the change. Shut the empty tank off, point the wand into a trash bag, and pull the trigger to empty all excess adhesive out of the hose and gun. Then, unhook the hose from the empty tank and immediately hook it up to a new cylinder. Don’t punch a hole through the side of the tank when the tank is under pressure – Once the hose is removed, open the tank back up slightly to relieve excess pressure. From there, punch a hole through the designated area and properly dispose of the tank. Additional Resources Request Free Trials  CAV GRIP III Low-VOC Adhesive/Primer Product Data Sheet  CAV GRIP III Low-VOC Adhesive/Primer Accessories Product Data Sheet CAV GRIP III Application Video CAV-GRIP III Time Trial Video For technical assistance, or for more information on CAV-GRIP III, please contact Ryan Ferguson.     Ryan Ferguson     EPDM Product Specialist     Product Marketing     [email protected]

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June 25, 2019

Welding TPO and PVC Coated Metal

Welding Carlisle’s coated metal is quick and easy if you follow a few simple guidelines. Here are some useful tips for your next Sure-Weld® TPO or Sure-Flex™ PVC Coated Metal installation. Product facts  Description: 24-gauge hot-dipped G90 galvanized steel sheeting with a layer of 35-mil non-reinforced TPO or PVC flashing laminated to one side Size: 4’ by 10’ Packaging: 10 or 25 sheets per pallet Standard colors: TPO – White, Tan, Gray, Bronze, Patina Green, Rock Brown, Terra Cotta, Slate Gray PVC – White, Tan, Gray Markings: The underside of each coated metal sheet is marked with “TPO” or “PVC”; these markings are repeated several times to avoid misidentification Shelf life: None IMPORTANT: TPO and PVC are not interchangeable and will not weld to each other Before you begin It is essential that the material is clean. The flat sheet goes through a few processes at the contractor’s metal shop, including shearing and breaking. When the metal is formed, it picks up dirt and contaminants that can negatively affect its weldability. The most common error associated with hot-air welding coated metal is the lack of proper cleaning. After the coated metal profiles are fastened into place on the roof and before you begin welding, clean with Weathered Membrane Cleaner (for TPO) or PVC and KEE HP Membrane Cleaner (for PVC and KEE HP). Pour the appropriate cleaner from a safety can onto an HP Splice Wipe or other natural fiber rag; then, wipe the metal with the wet cloth to make sure the entire area is clean. If there’s a heavy buildup of dirt, you may need to use a Primer Pad to remove it. When working with cleaners, remember to wear appropriate personal protective equipment, including safety glasses and permeation-resistant gloves that meet ANSI/ISEA 105-2005. Make sure the underside of the membrane being welded to the coated metal is also cleaned. Allow at least 10 to 15 minutes for the solvents in the cleaner to flash off the surfaces you’ll be welding. Heat welder setup When setting up your heat welder, you must consider the thickness of the membrane you’re welding to the coated metal. An 80-mil membrane will require more heat than a 45- or 50-mil membrane. Start the process with the hand welder at the number 7 or 8 setting. Because the 35-mil TPO or PVC film is laminated to the metal, it remains robust during the welding process and will accept more heat without distortion. Welding coated metal to membrane Start the welding process by building an air dam parallel to the rear edge of the metal. This will trap the heat and ensure it isn’t lost under the membrane. Using a hand welder and a 2” neoprene roller, weld the membrane to the coated metal, then roll in a perpendicular motion. Check your welds To check for proper fusion, weld a strip of membrane to a scrap piece of coated metal. Once your weld has cooled, pull the membrane until failure. Proper fusion has occurred if the membrane delaminates from itself, leaving the bottom ply welded to the film, or if the membrane tears when you try to pull it off the coated metal. For more information on securement requirements and instructions on how to address metal end joints, follow detail U-1B. Please contact Jim Gage with questions.     Jim Gage     Senior Technical Specialist     Product Marketing     [email protected]

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June 11, 2019

Flashing Options for Every Detail

Carlisle offers three different types of Sure-Seal® Pressure-Sensitive (PS) flashings to address the variety of details found on any given roof. All three feature the proven weatherability of EPDM and come with 30-mil of Pressure-Sensitive (PS) SecurTape™ to create a watertight seal. The primary difference among the three is the amount of cure in the rubber, and the process used to manufacture them. PS Elastoform – often called “uncured” flashing – is used to flash irregularly-shaped objects or details with multiple angle changes. The uncured state of the flashing allows the rubber to be formed and stretched into place without reverting to its original shape like cured rubber. The flashing formulation is designed to cure on the roof with exposure to heat. Since it is necessary to limit heat exposure in the manufacturing process; to keep the product uncured; Carlisle requires all edges to be lap sealed. This prevents water from getting between the flashing ply and the tape ply while the material cures on the roof. T-joints, corners, and pockets are all made from Elastoform flashing – which has a 9-month shelf life. PS Overlayment Strip – often called “semi-cured” flashing – utilizes the same Elastoform flashing formulation, but is semi-cured with heat during the manufacturing process. The overlayment strip has the dark black look of uncured flashing, but is 70% cured in order to add tear resistance for stripping in metal edging or end laps. PS Overlayment Strip is packaged without the diamond pattern film, as it is removed during the semi-curing process. This is an easy way to tell the difference between PS Overlayment Strip and a roll of PS Elastoform. Due to the semi-cured nature of PS Overlayment strip, it can seal step-offs at splice intersections of 60-mil rubber without the need for T-joint covers. PS Overlayment Strip is better suited to strip-in seams than PS Elastoform, as it eliminates the need for lap sealant and T-joints. PS Cured Cover Strip is made with the same 60-mil non-reinforced membrane as Carlisle’s standard sheeting, and then laminated to 30-mil of SecurTape. This product is primarily used for stripping-in metal or end-laps and offers the same finished appearance as the field membrane. Due to the fully-cured nature and thickness of the product, T-Joints are required at splice intersections. Carlisle SynTec’s Sure-White® Pressure-Sensitive Flashing is available in Elastoform and cured cover strip options, and is approved for use on both EPDM and TPO roofing systems. Sure-White Elastoform has a more aggressive cure package to account for the fact that the white flashing will not gain as much heat naturally on the roof. This translates into a shorter shelf life of 6 months. Keeping white or black Elastoform flashing cool during long term storage will help to maximize the shelf life. Carlisle SynTec has all your flashing needs covered. For more information about pressure-sensitive flashing, please contact your Regional Technical Manager.     Ron Goodman     EPDM Product Manager     Product Marketing     [email protected]

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May 28, 2019

CAV-GRIP III vs. Traditional Bonding Adhesive

With the introduction of Carlisle’s CAV-GRIP™ III Adhesive, it’s faster than ever to install fully-adhered TPO and EPDM. CAV-GRIP III can be used to adhere standard TPO and EPDM membranes in weather conditions down to 25°F, with a much faster application rate and flash-off time than traditional bonding adhesive. Check out this time trial video for proof, and use the tips below to ensure maximum speed and efficiency. Here are some keys to saving time and getting a the most out of CAV-GRIP III: Use larger cylinders and hose splitters: CAV-GRIP III comes in two sizes, 85lb. and 40lb. cylinders. Using 85lb. cylinders allows for more coverage from each tank without having to change tanks. By using a hose splitter, two people can spray CAV-GRIP III from one tank at the same time, allowing for faster application. Keep cylinders warm in cold weather: As CAV-GRIP III cylinders get cold, the coverage rate will be reduced and application will become more difficult. Store cylinders inside or in a hot-box at 70-80° before use. It is important not to set cylinders directly on a metal deck, as this will accelerate heat loss. Instead, always set the cylinder on insulation and use a Power Blanket to keep it warm during application. Overlap is key: When applying CAV-GRIP III to adhere EPDM or TPO in the field of the roof, very little overlap is required. While spraying, try to overlap 1-2 inches to ensure 100% coverage on the back of the sheet and the substrate. However, when using CAV-GRIP III to adhere membranes to walls, it is important to overlap 50% when spraying. Use CAV-GRIP III and these tips to save a ton of time and labor on the roof. The time that used to be spent stirring, rolling, and waiting for adhesive to flash off can be spent laying more squares of roof to get on to the next job more quickly. For more information, please visit the CAV-GRIP III Productivity Booster page, or contact Adam Burzynski with any questions.     Adam Burzynski     TPO Product Manager     Product Marketing     [email protected]

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May 14, 2019

Turn a Raining Day Into a Training Day

The roofing industry has endured more than its share of precipitation in recent months. Roofing contractors are challenged to work through backlogs and retain crews during down time. Consider making the next raining day a training day, and bring the crew into the office for additional training. When training content is in short supply, Carlisle SynTec Systems can help. The Carlisle SynTec Systems video hub is an online resource that can help roofing contractors both on and off the roof. This informative web page hosts over 80 short videos that are organized into the following categories: Details: This section features more than 30 videos that walk an applicator through the detailing of Carlisle’s thermoset and thermoplastic roofing systems. All detail videos are available with closed captioning in Spanish and French. What to Expect When We’re Inspecting: This content is great for foremen and applicators. Join a Carlisle field service representative on the roof as he takes the viewer through a step-by-step walkthrough of a Carlisle-warranted roof inspection. By understanding the inspectors’ processes and expectations, foremen can prevent punch-list items, and move onto the next job. Productivity Boosters: This series of videos is great for sales professionals, estimators, foremen, and installers. Viewers will see side-by-side time trial videos that calculate exactly how much labor can be saved by using newer, more innovative products and installation techniques. These productivity-boosting products will help applicators recoup lost time and revenue; and these videos will show them how. Access the Carlisle SynTec Systems video hub today or click the “Watch Videos” link on the Carlisle SynTec Systems home page. For more information about Carlisle SynTec Systems’ virtual educational content and video hub, please contact Rob Reale.     Rob Reale     Director of Integrated Marketing Communications     Integrated Marketing Communications     [email protected]

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April 30, 2019

Achieve the Look of a Metal Roof Using New TPO Colors and Contour Rib

The Sure-Weld® TPO Contour Rib profile is a great way to achieve a standing seam metal roof look on sloped roofs or mansards. Sure-Weld TPO membrane and the contour rib profile are now stocked with no minimum order quantities in five special colors in addition to the standard white, gray, and tan options. This makes it even easier to satisfy a building owner’s desire for an aesthetically pleasing standing seam look using TPO. When using special color TPO and contour rib, an owner will be judging the finished roof on its looks, in addition to its performance. It’s important to ensure proper spacing and alignment, and consider where membrane splices will fall when installing the contour rib profile. Here are some easy tips to follow on your next contour rib profile job: “Measure twice, cut once”: Similar to the old carpenter’s saying, check your measurements before you start the job. Prior to installing any contour ribs, measure the spacing for the ribs on the roof to ensure they are spaced properly. If possible, try to align the edge of a contour rib with a splice in the membrane to hide seams. Use a jig or pan to make spacing easy: Once the spacing has been determined, lay out a few ribs on the ground and position the automatic welder as if the rib is being welded. Then, measure the space between the edge of the welder and the next rib. This dimension can be used to fabricate a metal pan to ensure proper alignment and spacing of the ribs. The first rib is critical: Always chalk a line to position and install the first rib. Align the edge of the rib with the chalk line and tack-weld it every 6” to ensure it is perfectly straight and stays in place. If done properly, the first rib can act as a guide to align the next rib using the metal spacing pan. Ensure that after tack welding the first rib for positioning purposes, it is fully welded for permanent installation. Use heat to hold contour rib pieces together: To reduce separation of connected contour rib pieces during the welding process, use a hand welder to heat the end of one of the contour ribs after inserting the connector pin, and push the two ends together. This will help eliminate small gaps between contour rib pieces. Sure-Weld TPO special colors and contour ribs can give a building the look of a metal roof, with the fast installation and proven performance of TPO. Refer to the Contour Rib Installation Guide for more great tips to make sure your next Special Color Contour Rib installation is a success.     Adam Burzynski     TPO Product Manager     Product Marketing     [email protected]

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April 16, 2019

Storage of Materials During Inclement Weather

When storing roofing materials prior to install, it is important to remember most roofing materials are not designed to be stored in cold or inclement weather conditions; especially when ambient temperatures dip below 40°F. Membranes, adhesives, equipment, and contractors will perform differently in colder or inclement weather - so planning and considering how the inclement weather will impact material storage, installation time, and quality is critical. Membrane: Storing roofing membrane at the job site during warm months is straightforward: keep the rolls off the ground (on pallets), and protect them from moisture by using breathable, waterproof tarpaulins. In inclement weather, temperatures could grow colder - the dew point and temperature come closer together; increasing the potential for condensation and frost forming on materials; and storms/winds become more frequent. Keep roofing materials warm and dry by storing them inside a conditioned space or in a heated job trailer. Keeping materials warm and dry will reduce the risk of moisture being introduced into the roof system during construction, and minimize the possibility of deficiencies in the completed roof system. In addition, material rolls will become more rigid as they get colder, requiring additional time to kick out and relax the membrane before installing. In wet or windy conditions, make sure the roof membrane rolls are covered with a breathable-waterproof tarp and that the tarpaulins are secured to prevent wind damage and/or displacement such as with a pallet or bands. Please note that flashings must be heated prior to application, regardless of the season. When these products are heated until warm to the touch, they will be much easier to install, particularly when flashing corners and irregular shapes. Adhesives/Pressure-Sensitive Products: When dealing with membrane adhesives, there are generally two main categories to consider: solvent-based and waterborne adhesives. Recently, the use of waterborne adhesives has been growing steadily because of low-odor and VOC code requirements. Both types of adhesives have similar manufacturer recommendations for storage temperature, typically between 60° and 80°F. Adhesives, primers, or pressure-sensitive products can be stored at temperatures below 60°F, but must be restored to between 60°-80°F prior to application for best results. When ambient temperatures are expected to fall below 40°F for an extended period, a heated enclosure or hot box is strongly recommended for jobsite storage. This applies to pressure-sensitive products as well. Insulation: Polyisocyanurate or polystyrene insulation is typically shipped protected by a plastic wrap, plastic bag, or both. This factory packaging is intended for handling the polyisocyanurate in the manufacturing plant and during transit; it should not be relied upon as protection at jobsites or other outdoor storage locations, unless otherwise specified by the manufacturer. To ensure insulation is properly protected in inclement weather, follow these steps: Store bundles flat and upright with the bottom of the bundles elevated (2” or more) above a finished surface -preferably gravel, pavement, or concrete - rather than on dirt or grass. Slit the bundle packaging vertically down the center of the two short sides to prevent moisture accumulation within the package. Completely cover the bundle with a waterproof tarp and secure to prevent wind damage and/or displacement, such as a pallet. Following these steps as outlined above will increase the success and longevity of the roofing materials. For more information about storage of materials in inclement weather, please contact John Greko.     John Greko     PVC Product Manager     Product Marketing     [email protected]

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April 2, 2019

Solve Unique Problems with PVC Pressure-Sensitive Cover Strip

In the past, metal edge options on a PVC roof were extremely limited. Applicators had a choice of white, gray, or tan coated metal unless they were willing to step up to an expensive two-piece metal edge system. This is no longer the case. With the introduction of Carlisle’s Sure-Flex™ Pressure-Sensitive (PS) PVC Cover Strip, the building owner or architect can now choose any color Kynar-coated metal that they prefer. The PVC PS Cover Strip installation process looks like this: Apply the PVC Step 1 Activator to the membrane surface with a roller. The Activator is the first of two primer steps that prepare the membrane to accept the pressure-sensitive cover strip. After the Activator has completely flashed-off, the Step 2 Primer can be applied. Ensure that the primer is covering both the Activator, and the metal. The third and final step is to install the pressure-sensitive cover strip once the primer has flashed-off. Unroll a few feet, pull the release liner, and place the cover strip onto the previously-primed surface. Adhere using a hand roller. Use of the Sure-Flex PVC Pressure-Sensitive Cover Strip will save money, labor, and time on the roof. Utilize this problem-solving product on a current PVC roofing job, and experience what applicators have been calling a “game changer.” To learn more, view the installation guide or visit the Problem Solver page. For more information about Sure-Flex PVC PS Cover Strip, please contact Jesse Sutton.     Jesse Sutton     PVC Technical Specialist     Product Marketing     [email protected]

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March 26, 2019

Rolling Out 100 Years of Innovation

"The heart and soul of the company is creativity and innovation." -Robert Iger, Chairman and CEO of The Walt Disney Company Innovation and creativity is not only a mantra for creative powerhouses such as The Walt Disney Company, but it is a calling card for all businesses looking to add value to customers. Innovation and creativity is a part of Carlisle Construction Materials’ culture and is instilled in the DNA of all employees throughout the organization. It is this commitment to innovation that has elevated Carlisle as one of the most innovative organizations in a relatively stagnant industry, low-slope commercial roofing. It all began in the 1960s when Carlisle first took its butyl single-ply elastomeric sheeting, originally manufactured for agriculture-related applications, and applied it to the rooftop as a waterproofing barrier. It was in 1961 that Carlisle literally took low-slope roofing to the next level by installing this membrane on the 190-foot-diameter “floating” deep-dish roof on the circular restaurant building at O’Hare International Airport in Chicago, IL. This was the first time that a rubber protective membrane had ever been used in a roofing application, and the rest is now history. Throughout the years, the Carlisle commitment to innovation established the company as an undisputed leader in the low-slope commercial roofing industry. And this commitment has never been more evident than the products introduced in the last few years. The recent development of innovative products and services is altering the way a commercial roofing system is installed. Productivity-boosting products – such as RapidLock (RL™) roofing systems, TPO with APEEL Protective Film, and the revolutionary CAV-GRIP™ III Low-VOC Adhesive/Primer – are allowing crews to get more squares done in less time and with a smaller crew; at a critical time when skilled labor continues to be a challenge. In addition, problem-solving products – such as PVC Pressure-Sensitive Cover Strip, VacuSeal roofing systems, OPTIM-R, and ChannelDry – will help applicators navigate challenging rooftop scenarios. Just as Robert Iger famously said, creativity and innovation truly is the heart and soul of a company, and it is the foundation of Carlisle Construction Materials. Regardless of what the future holds, the company’s values – dedication to quality, innovation, creativity and customer support – will remain unchanged for the next 100 years and beyond.     Jason Mortelliti     CCM Marketing Communications Manager     Integrated Marketing Communications     [email protected]

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March 22, 2019

IRE 2019: Education and New Products Take the Spotlight (Part 2)

If you missed Part 1, which summarizes some favorite sessions from Carlisle’s-sponsored Training & Education Center on the show floor, please click here. See below for Part 2. Recent statistics indicate that 92% of attendees visit tradeshows to see and learn about new products and services. And the 2019 International Roofing Expo (IRE) is no exception. For years, the IRE has been the launching point for new products and innovations – and is a focal point for all marketers in the industry when assembling marketing plans. Having won the IRE’s Product Showcase for Best New Product in 2015 for Sure-Flex KEE HP and again in 2018 for RapidLock (RL™) Roofing Systems, Carlisle certainly places a large emphasis on the audience IRE provides and places its new products and innovations center stage. This year in Nashville, Carlisle once again took the opportunity to showcase several new roofing technologies and launched some game-changing products and systems. One of these systems was the VacuSeal™ Vent Secured Roofing System. This is an innovative assembly that uses special vents to harness the power of the wind to lock roof membranes in place. VacuSeal systems are productivity-boosting, reduce installation time, and minimize the need for traditional fastening methods. There are no cold-weather limitations for the installation of VacuSeal, and the system is UL certified with uplift certification at 195 psf negative pressure. Sure-Flex™ PVC Pressure-Sensitive (PS) Cover Strip is another groundbreaking new product launched at this year’s IRE. Used for stripping-in flat metal edging, Sure-Flex PVC PS Cover Strip saves time, labor, and money by eliminating the need for PVC-coated metal or two-piece clip-on edge metal. This product is compatible with a variety of metal finishes and is quick and easy to install; no welding is required. A truly revolutionary product and the first of its kind in PVC single-ply roofing. Finally, Carlisle unveiled EcoStorm VSH Roof Board, which is a high-density cover board composed of a plastic and cellulose fiber core bonded to a paper facer and a coated glass facer. The core is made from 100% post-consumer packaging that would otherwise end up in a landfill. EcoStorm VSH passes the FM Very Severe Hail (VSH) standard, and is rated Class A UL 790 for fire resistance. This roof board is compatible with mechanically fastened and adhered membranes, as well as having high impact resistance. With the industry focused on innovation, the ability to take advantage of tradeshows to promote new and game-changing products is just as critical today as it was 20 years ago. I am excited for 2020 and to see what new products will be on display in Dallas – we hope to see you there. For more information about the International Roofing Expo or Carlisle's participation at industry trade shows, please contact Jason Mortelliti.     Jason Mortelliti     CCM Marketing Communications Manager     Integrated Marketing Communications     [email protected]

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March 19, 2019

Cold Weather’s Effect on Flexible FAST Dual Tank Adhesives

Maintaining the proper storage and installation temperature of Carlisle Flexible FAST roofing adhesive materials will improve the string time/rise time, and will also assist in achieving the proper viscosity of the materials; which in turn will help to increase yield/coverage of your Flexible FAST materials. Problem: When working in the states highlighted below, it is important to pay attention to the average daily temperatures when storing and installing Carlisle Flexible FAST adhesives. Here is a simple explanation of viscosity: Viscosity is a complicated and sometimes confusing topic, and understanding how to lower viscosity is a challenge during cold winter months. A fluid that is viscous will be thick, sticky, and semifluid in consistency. You can lower viscosity by adding friction and/or increasing temperature. In short, the warmer the material, the thinner the fluid - meaning less friction and increased material flow. Proper material temperatures can also affect the performance of the adhesive. When material temperatures are below the recommended levels, the adhesive cannot properly mix due to the increased viscosity. It is always important to keep your adhesives stored and applied at the temperatures recommended by the manufacturer. Carlisle’s Temperature Storage and Application Recommendations Flexible DASH Bulk and Dual Tank Do not store Flexible FAST at temperatures above 100°F or below 50°F. Kits stored below 70°F must be given time for the internal material temperature to warm up to 70°F prior to use. When storing or using adhesive in temperatures below 40°F, the adhesive internal temperature must be returned to 70°F prior to use. Placing adhesive in a heated area (70-90°F) for 4 hours should allow liquid adhesive to reach 70-90°F. In colder temperatures, it is recommended to utilize heated blankets to ensure the tanks are kept warm while dispensing the product. Solution: In the winter months, proper material temperatures become imperative. Regardless of the urethane adhesive (FAST or Flexible FAST), material temperatures at the time of installation should be 70°F or rising. When temperatures fall below 70°F, urethane adhesives can experience mixture ratio issues. The use of heated blankets or hot boxes should be used to keep material temperatures above 70°F. Heated blankets make it easy to lower the viscosity of Carlisle’s Flexible Fast Dual Tank adhesives. Heated blankets are available in various ready-to-ship products, including dual tank and single tank adhesive offerings and pallet blankets. If you need help with material storage or viscosity reduction, Carlisle SynTec Systems has you covered. Contact your local Carlisle representative for more information. Carlisle has partnered with two equipment manufactures that provide heated blankets. For more information, contact 4C’s Spray Equipment. Amped Equipment. or Advanced Roofing Innovations (ARI). Heated Blanket Viscosity-Improving Products: Flexible FAST Frequently Asked Questions Q: How long will it take a heated blanket to warm a cold tank? A: Tanks can take anywhere from 4-8 hours to return to the proper application temperature. Q: Can I use a heated band to warm tank or cylinder products? A: No -under no circumstances should you use a heated band product with a pressurized tank (Dual Tanks or CAV-GRIP™ III). Heater bands can reach temperatures of 300°F – 400°F, which will overheat the tank and cause it to explode. Q:Are heated blankets safe to use with Dual Tanks? A: Yes, heated blankets have a regulated temperature of 80°F - 100°F and are designed to work with pressurized tanks. For more information about FAST Dual Tank Adhesives, please contact Austin Kulp.     Austin Kulp     Fleece Membranes & Coatings Product Manager     Product Marketing     [email protected]

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March 13, 2019

Talk Roofing with Carlisle SynTec's Mike DuCharme

Carlisle SynTec’s Vice President of Marketing, Mike DuCharme, has recently served as the chairman of the EPDM Roofing Association (ERA). In this capacity, DuCharme sat down with BUILDINGS’ senior writer – Janelle Penny – at the 2019 International Roofing Expo (IRE) to talk roofing on the BUILDINGS podcast. DuCharme brought to the podcast a wealth of knowledge about the roofing industry, which he has gathered over his past 35 years in the industry, and as the chair of ERA for the past 2 years. ERA is a trade association that represents the manufacturers of EPDM single-ply roofing materials, and works to ensure that the roofing industry is focusing on the most important and relevant current building trends. As many in the industry know, there is a need for resiliency in roofing products, as well as sustainability. These two things have been a main focus over recent years in the roofing industry and for ERA, and DuCharme discusses the different ways in which focusing on creating sustainable and resilient products is the best option for all building material manufacturers. To listen to the podcast, and hear what DuCharme has to say about the state of the roofing industry, click here. To learn more about BUILDINGS, click here. For more information on BUILDINGS Magazine, click here. To listen to more of the BUILDINGS Podcast, click here.

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March 8, 2019

IRE 2019: Education and New Products Take the Spotlight

Approximately 10 years ago, the marketing community was declaring conventions and tradeshows a dying industry. However, after attending the 2019 International Roofing Expo (IRE) in Nashville, Tennessee last month, this notion has not infiltrated the roofing industry. With more than 14,000 attendees and nearly 500 exhibiting companies, the roofing industry certainly supports tradeshows and continues to find value in bringing together like-minded professionals and friendly competitors pitching their products, and selling their services. The most striking takeaway from the IRE this year was that professional education and new product launches took center stage. As one of many exhibiting/sponsoring companies that promoted education and announced new products, it was evident that the roofing industry continues to support these endeavors. With so much activity on the tradeshow floor and the energy that consumes Music City, it was easy to miss some of these excellent promotions. This post is part one of two, and will summarize of some of my favorite sessions from Carlisle’s-sponsored Training & Education Center on the show floor. Worker Training Programs and NRCA ProCertification™ As the roofing industry faces compelling workforce challenges, it is more important than ever to offer exceptional training and a career path for field workers. Guest speakers from NRCA presented this session that focused on their training and certification programs, and provided guidance on how to attract and retain workers while maximizing productivity—and the bottom line. Unique Solutions for Challenging Situations A commercial roofing installation is complex and ever-evolving. No two roof installations are the same. In this session, guests learned about various solutions to solve some of the unique challenges they may encounter. For example, alternative solutions to flash oddly shaped penetrations, how to achieve high R-values where you have height restrictions, and how to harness the power of the wind for a vacuum-sealed roof, to name just a few. Proper Design & Detailing of a Metal Roof Although not a single-ply presentation, this session - co-sponsored by Sherwin-Williams and CCM’s Drexel Metals-was worth checking out if you wanted to Make More with Metal. During this session, important factors such as wind speed and other environmental elements, positive and negative loading, roof slope, and roof height were all discussed. All of these elements require special consideration when planning a metal roof system. How to Save Material Costs and Labor by Using EPS in a Single-Ply System CCM’s Insulfoam brand sponsored this session, which discussed how to achieve required R-values with fewer insulation layers and less time overall on the roof. Attendees learned how to get the highest R-value per dollar with hybrid EPS and Polyiso insulation systems in a single-ply system to save time and money. Liquid Applied Roofing: Sustaining Roof Assets CCM’s Carlisle Roof Foam and Coatings sponsored this presentation that covered tools and systematic approaches for evaluating existing roof systems, understanding application constraints, and keys to successful liquid-applied restoration systems. Understanding U.S. Energy Codes This session dove deep into the current energy code landscape in the U.S. (state and local) and provided attendees with the resources needed to determine statewide and local energy codes. In addition, new construction vs. reroofing energy codes were discussed, and the pain points associated therein. These are just a handful of the sessions that were presented in a jam-packed couple days in Nashville. And one thing is certain: the desire to learn and grown your business is still a domineering force in the roofing industry – and as long as tradeshows continue to deliver record attendance – innovative new educational opportunities will evolve. Stay tuned for “part two” in a couple weeks.     Jason Mortelliti     CCM Marketing Communications Manager     Integrated Marketing Communications     [email protected]

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March 5, 2019

Approved Ice and Snow Melts for use on EPDM Membrane

Keeping a roof in top-notch shape during the winter is of the utmost importance to building owners and applicators alike – keeping crews safe and upholding the integrity of the roofing materials is a non-negotiable. One of the most common questions about an EPDM roofing system in the winter is in regards to the chemical compatibility of rock salt or other ice melts with EPDM membrane. EPDM is chemically resistant to rock salt (also known as halite or sodium chloride) and calcium chloride. If either of these two materials are applied according to the suppliers’ recommendation on an EPDM roof, there will be no chemical degradation of the membrane. The biggest concern with rock salt and calcium chloride pellets is the physical form these ice melts come in. Rock salt is a hard, crystalline product that could harm the membrane if walked on after application. Calcium chloride pellets are somewhat softer in consistency, but could still potentially cause damage to the membrane if walked on before breaking down from the pellet form. Because of this, it is wise to limit foot traffic over any areas where ice melts have been applied, in order to minimize the potential for damaging the membrane through abrasion or puncture. It should also be noted, that chemicals such as halite or sodium chloride can potentially cause corrosion to some metals – in particular, aluminum or copper – so it is wise to avoid application of these chemicals around any area on the roof that is made of these materials. For more information regarding installation, care, and upkeep of EPDM – please contact Ron Goodman.     Ron Goodman     EPDM Product Manager     Product Marketing     [email protected]

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February 19, 2019

LIQUISEAL Liquid Flashing - It's All in the Preparation

From irregularly-shaped and hard to flash penetrations – to creating tie-ins without impeding the flow of water – liquid flashing can solve a lot of problems on the roof. However, it can also be difficult to apply if not done correctly. Here are some simple tips and guidelines to utilize when working with LIQUISEAL® Liquid Flashing: LIQUISEAL Liquid Flashing is an incredibly durable product but it won't adhere properly if surfaces aren't prepared. Always use the tables on LF-A, B, & C to determine what preparation is needed for a given substrate. Here are some examples for common surfaces: Metal: Grind clean to expose bare steel or aluminum and create a rough surface before priming. Do not use a wire brush. Then apply LIQUISEAL Liquid Flashing Metal Primer and allow the primer to cure fully (this may take several hours). EPDM: Scuff the membrane using 60 grit sandpaper and clean with Weathered Membrane Cleaner. After this is complete, apply LIQUISEAL Liquid Flashing Metal Primer and allow the primer to cure fully (this may take several hours). TPO: Clean TPO with Weathered Membrane Cleaner - do not scuff with sandpaper as with other membranes - and apply Carlisle SynTec's TPO Primer and allow to flash off. PVC & KEE: Scuff the membrane surface using 60 grit sandpaper and clean with PVC cleaner. No primer is needed prior to application on PVC or KEE membranes. Always pre-cut and dry-fit your reinforcing fleece before mixing the resin. LIQUISEAL Liquid Flashing Resin has a "pot-life" of about 20-30 minutes once mixed, so prioritizing time is key. Take the time to watch this flashing video or this tie-in video, review the installation instructions on the Carlisle SynTec website, and review details before using LIQUISEAL Liquid Flashing. A little bit of time spent reviewing these up front can save applicators considerable time on the roof, and prevent the potential waste of product. For more information about liquid flashing, please contact Adam Burzynski.     Adam Burzynski     TPO Product Manager     Product Marketing     [email protected]

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February 5, 2019

Ensure Your Membrane Splices Are Up to Industry Standards

Installing a water-tight single-ply roofing system is necessary to ensure a successful, long-lasting, and effective roofing experience. One of the biggest challenges in the application of these systems is ensuring that all seams, curbs, and miscellaneous items are flashed-in per industry standards. Of those items, seams are an integral part of the system and their central purpose is to tie-in one sheet of membrane to another. Proper mating of both sheets at this connection point not only creates one uniform system, but also serves as the first line of defense to moisture infiltration. Many warranty claims can be attributed to this aspect of a single-ply system and is a very common reason for roof failure. Carlisle SynTec’s Sure-Seal® EPDM Kleen Non-Reinforced roofing membrane makes installing seams easier and ensures seam integrity in the long term – resulting in less call-backs, and a better relationship between the applicator and customer. There are many benefits to installing seams on Sure-Seal EPDM Kleen membranes: The membrane is pre-cleaned to remove mica dust, therefore eliminating the need to clean the seam areas with Weathered Membrane Cleaner prior to the application of primer.  Pre-cleaned EPDM allows primer to be applied with a roller.  Three-inch and six-inch Factory-Applied Tape (FAT) is available on all Sure-Seal Kleen membranes up to 10-feet wide which greatly reduces the time needed to complete seams.  The above steps will improve productivity in the field, create less jobsite waste, and result in a quality-controlled installation. Please reach out to your local Carlisle Representative for more information about our Sure-Seal EPDM Kleen products. For more information about EPDM products, please contact Ryan Ferguson.     Ryan Ferguson     EPDM Product Specialist     Product Marketing     [email protected]

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January 22, 2019

New Training Programs for 2019

Carlisle places a high value on education and offers training year-round at locations across the United States and Canada. Training classes are open to employees of current Carlisle authorized applicators, as well as companies in the process of establishing a new account. Employees of Carlisle-recognized representatives and distributors are also welcome to attend. If you are unsure whether you are eligible to attend Carlisle’s training courses, email [email protected] or call (717) 245-7066. FAQs Q: How much do the programs cost? A: There is no charge to participate in any of Carlisle’s training programs. Carlisle will also provide lunch on all full days of class. Q: How long will I be away from the office? A: This will depend on the course. Please take note of the start and stop times for each class. The certification courses last for two-and-a-half days and the foreman’s workshops last for five days. All other classes are one day each. Q: How do we achieve certification with Carlisle? A: To become a Carlisle authorized applicator, you must attend the full applicator certification course. Certificates are issued at the conclusion of training. If you are a new roofer seeking certification, please contact your Carlisle manufacturer’s representative before trying to register for a class.  2019 Training Course  Training Locations: Montgomery, NY; Kennesaw, GA; Carlisle, PA; Tooele, UT; Wylie, TX Applicator Certification Seminar (required to become a Carlisle Authorized Applicator) 2.5 days long, once a month in Carlisle PA, held in other locations based on availability Hands-on and classroom training focused on EPDM, TPO, PVC, and insulation attachment and common flashing details including curbs, corners, and roof penetrations Foreman-Level Training 5 days long, springtime, all locations Advanced EPDM, TPO, and PVC application and inspection techniques, project monitoring and site management, identifying and fixing installation errors, site organization, and team leadership EPDM 101 5 days long, springtime, all locations  Introduction to EPDM systems and products TPO/PVC 101 1 day long, twice a year, PA location Introduction to TPO and PVC systems and products EPDM 201 1 day long, twice a year, PA location Hands-on training in EPDM details and applications TPO/PVC 201 1 day long, twice a year, PA location Hands-on training in TPO and PVC details and applications Specialty and Premium Products, New Products, and Boosting Productivity 301 1 day long, twice a year, PA location Hands-on and classroom training in Roof Gardens, FleeceBACK, edge metal, and productivity-boosting products and techniques Understanding Design Criteria 401 1 day long, twice a year, PA location Teaches attendees how to apply the performance section of an architectural specification to a warrantable roof assembly Industry Challenges 501 1 day long, twice a year, PA location Examines common industry challenges, including the differences in versions of industry standards (ASCE, IBC, IECC, etc.), moisture in concrete, reflectivity, LEED, ES-1, and energy codes

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January 8, 2019

Installation Tips: Don't Let Cold Weather Stall Your Project

Cold-weather installations can be challenging and may require extra time and labor. Check out these storage and installation tips to help your winter projects run more smoothly. Storage Tips Low-VOC adhesives and primers and pressure-sensitive (PS) accessories Store between 60°F-80°F. If stored below 60°F, restore to between 60°F-80°F before application. If adhesive is stored in below-freezing temperatures, it may solidify in the can. If this occurs, restore to room temperature for at least 24 hours before using.  Water-based adhesives (HydroBond™, Aqua Base 120) will freeze in temperatures below 32°F and will be unusable thereafter.  On winter jobsites, a heated enclosure or hot box is essential to ensure that adhesives and PS products maintain their intended properties and ease of application. Visit powerblanket.com for more information on jobsite heating equipment.  Application Tips Low-VOC Bonding Adhesive and EPDM x-23 Low-VOC Bonding Adhesive Allow membranes to relax for at least 30 minutes before installing.  Avoid puddles and globs, and re-roll any wet areas to break the skin and allow solvents to flash off.  Shaded roof areas take longer to flash off than sunny areas.  Use the “tack test” to ensure that solvents have flashed off and the adhesive is still tacky.  If the adhesive is not tacky, it has over-dried and must be re-applied at the published coverage rate. Install the membrane shortly after adhesive passes the tack test, then immediately broom or roll the membrane after setting the sheet.  PS EPDM flashings In cold temperatures, a heat gun must be used to warm PS flashings until warm to the touch prior to installation. This will make application much quicker and easier.  TPO membranes Test weld in the morning and then again after lunch when the temperature has likely increased.  The speed of the Automatic Heat Welder may need to be adjusted to produce proper seams.  FAST and Flexible FAST Keep your materials warm. FAST in drums must be a minimum of 70°F for the material to flow and mix properly. Storing FAST drums outside overnight in cold temperatures can cause the adhesive to freeze. FAST Bag in a Box and FAST Dual Cartridges should be stored in a hot box on the roof. For more information about building codes, please contact your local sales representative.

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January 2, 2019

Help Us Process Your NOA Quickly

Tired of receiving email notices that your project has been placed on hold by the Project Review and Design department? Here are few tips to ensure that your NOA will be processed without delay. Upload your roof plan when you upload the NOA This prevents your project from being placed on hold and expedites the inspection process once the roof is complete. Verify insulation type, brand, and thickness Omitting this information will cause your project to be placed on hold. Confirm that the membrane type and thickness comply with the warranty requirements It is important to confirm that the membrane type and thickness comply with the warranty requirements. For example, if your NOA is requesting a 20-year Total System Warranty but the membrane thickness is listed as 45-mil, the project will be placed on hold. Include the deck type This helps to ensure that the roof system you plan to install is acceptable for the intended application. If the deck type is not indicated, the project will be placed on hold. Worse, you may end up installing your roof over a substrate that is not acceptable for the application, which can lead to additional costs or even rejection of the roof system from warranty consideration. Carlisle’s Web Resource Center is full of tutorial videos and helpful tips. Click here for a short instructional video about adding a new Notice of Award (NOA) and uploading a drawing.

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January 2, 2019

We're Live!

Welcome to Carlisle SynTec's new blog, TecTopics - a fresh take on the former newsletter of the same name. The TecTopics blog will serve to provide a digital resource for Carlisle to communicate directly with its audience - you. The goal of this blog is to provide applicators, installers, building owners, and architects with information and guidance on matters such as material installation, system detailing, roof maintenance, and current roofing industry issues. The information in TecTopics is designed to educate the roofing community about the proper installation, maintenance, warranties, and more when it comes to single-ply roofing systems. TecTopics will be published biweekly, providing information directly from Carlisle's subject matter experts – from the system design and review team to product managers. This blog should be used as an educational tool and reference guide, and the information in the blogs can be shared via social media with your customers or via email or word of mouth with your roofing crew. If you have any questions regarding TecTopics - or any burning topics you that you would like to see covered in TecTopics, please visit us here and let the Carlisle SynTec team know.

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